Everyone Brave Is Forgiven by Chris Cleave

imgres.jpgEveryone Brave Is Forgiven
Chris Cleave
Published May 3, 2016
432 pages

Why I read it: I am a huge fan of Chris Cleave’s Little Bee (a powerful, beautifully-written novel that you MUST read if you have not already). His other books (Incendiary, Gold) aren’t as good, but this, his latest, showed a lot of promise. It was an Amazon Best Book of the Month, an Indie Next List pick, and a LibraryReads List selection for May 2016, and it earned rave reviews. Hoping that it would live up to the hype, I also recommended it as the July selection for my book club.   

What it’s about: Set primarily in Britain during World War II, the book follows a cast of flawed characters driven to assist in the war in a variety of ways. There’s the rich and clueless Mary, who signs up for war with visions of espionage and covert ops (but ends up teaching at an elementary school and, later, driving an ambulance). There’s the bumbling but sweet Tom, who runs the schools for the undesirable children still left in London. There’s the witty Alastair, who enlists. And there’s Hilda (an always-the-bridesmaid type), who becomes a nurse. Their intertwined stories show the many faces of war (the creation of enduring friendships, unspeakable tragedies, unlikely bravery).

Rating: 3.5/5 Continue reading

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided

imgresIn the Country We Love: My Family Divided
Diane Guerrero with Michelle Burford
Published May 3, 2016
272 pages

Why I read it: I have no shame in admitting that I have a very real love for trashy television. One of my current favorites (the first season of which I binge-watched when my baby was a newborn and doing nothing but nursing and sleeping all day long) is Jane the Virgin, a super campy telenovela about a virgin who was mistakenly artificially inseminated:

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When You Can’t Go to a Restaurant, You Have to Settle for Reading about One (or Two)

My daughter was diagnosed as milk- and soy-protein intolerant when she was about three months old. She was exclusively breastfed, which meant I had to cut all dairy and soy from my diet cold turkey. This meant, of course, giving up my very favorite food: ice cream (yes, I am a child). Despite the massive amounts of dairy I consumed (cheese, yogurt, and ice cream every day), it was surprisingly easy to give it all up.

On the flip side, there was one thing that was very, VERY hard: bidding adieu to eating out. When we first found out, we still tried to go to restaurants. But, even when we called ahead to warn them of our allergies, I always ended up inadvertently consuming something (there are tell-tale diaper signs, the details of which I will spare you). We realized that the only way to ensure she wasn’t getting anything bad was to cook all of our meals at home. Let me tell you: when you have an infant, cooking every single meal at home is not ideal.

We’re still powering through. Our repertoire of dairy-free meals has grown exponentially, and we have become slow-cooker champions. There are still days when my husband and I look at each other and say, “UGH. I wish we could just go out to eat tonight. I do NOT feel like cooking,” but, for the most part, it hasn’t been too bad. And, when I need a little restaurant fix, I just watch Chef’s Table on Netflix or read a restaurant book like these two. It’s not the same, but it will have to do for now. Continue reading